March 5, 2013

To his friend...


11 comments:

  1. Well,at least he didnt say he had the idea and THEN some internet fiend stole it...

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  2. I have to wonder if he knew George RR Martin wrote it and he still thought he could have it made into a television show.

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  3. Oh, yeah? You wanna talk about being pissed off??? *I* had the idea to make this guy's comment into an online comic before Mr. Tim did!!!

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  4. Matt Groenig went into my mind and stole my idea for Futurama! Then he went back in time and stole it from the guy who created Buck Rogers!

    But I'll fix him! One of these days, I'll peel myself out of this chair and go sell my idea for Space Simps! It features a fat space guy called Romer Simp and his pain-in-the-ass space kid Brat Simp! It's genius and I'll be a gazillionaire! DON'T STEAL MY IDEA!!

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  5. It seems every comic shop has it's share of people who had great ideas that were totally ripped off.
    "I came up with the original idea for The Walking Dead, I tried selling it to different comic companies including Image but no one bought it, then suddenly Image comes out with this crap? No justice, man, no justice!"

    "Y'know, a Battlestar Galactica revamp was my idea."

    and so on, at one store I used to frequent the co-owner claimed to have come up with various titles and totally original ideas first, like various EXTREME revamps of superheros and the like, and various other claims. he looked pretty much the Comic Book Guy from the Simpons, balding, ponytailed, gut, etc.

    Only this guy claimed he actually was the inspiration for the CBG. I forget his exact story as it seemed to change depending on who he told it to, but from what I remember he said he knew Matt Groening from "way back" when he worked at the shop Groening frequented in California and he was the basis for the character. He also said that he knew Kevin Smith whom he met when he used to hang out with Jason Mewes, or maybe he used to hang out with Kevin Smith and that's how he met Jason Mewes, like I said details of his stories shifted cosntantly. He also claimed to have, while working in California, sold a copy of the first Spiderman personally to Nicholas Cage in exchange for a briefcase full of cash - and from what I gathered from some other people at his previous job had negotiated the sale of a huge lot of Golden Age DC comics to another local comic shop, in which he provided a full list of rare comics, negotiated a price, then showed up without the comics expecting to be paid anyway.

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  6. When I owned a comic shop, we had this guy come in who frequently talked about writing on comic blogs and how he would develop a thread, and all of a sudden the thread disappeared, and a couple of months later marvel or dc came out with his storyline. He referred back to storylines in the past that originally had been his idea, also. We called him "Mr. "I invented the Marvel and DC Universe" guy". Not to his face, of course.

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  7. Seems legit. Like no-one ever before him could think of turning a book they like into a TV series.
    It's SO UNFAIR that someone actually moved their ass, asked George R.R. Martin for permission and proposed a series pitch to a TV producer.

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  8. Wait? Wanting to make a tv show out of a book is something to complain about when it does get made? Hell, I've wanted a Walking Dead tv show for a long time. I even did a project for a photo class using Walking Dead as an inspiration. Then again one was Rick and Tyreese at the prison and I didn't have the dumb idea to introduce him afterwards like the show did. Blech.

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  9. Yeah, guess what, buddy? So did every OTHER perverted nerd who thinks a fantasy show isn't any good unless it's full of gratuitous naked women, borderline pornography, and blatant sexual innuendo.

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  10. in fact George R.R. Martin had people approaching him to make the series into a show as early as the second book, but he held off until they were a big enough success that he'd be able to keep creative control. he used to write for TV (and still does); he knew he had a hit.

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