November 28, 2012

To her friend...


11 comments:

  1. The sad part is I'm right there with her. I don't have a lot of nerd friends, and if it weren't for internet I would missed out on quite a bit.

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    1. That's not what she's saying though. She's not saying the internet is allowing her to find new things to like, she's saying she literally only likes what the internet tells her to like.

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    2. "she's saying she literally only likes what the internet tells her to like"

      NOW can we stop pretending he doesn't make this stuff up?

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  2. She's clearly just mis-expressing her gratitude for being exposed to so many wonderful things that she wouldn't have known about otherwise.

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    1. I agree with you. I think the internet allows her to broaden her horizons and discover new things that she adores.

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    2. I agree too. Knowing what stuff you dislike is easy. Finding stuff you actually like requires access to them, and awareness of their existence. That said, I still have a bit of reservations about someone who'd really require the internet for that, I think that she underestimates (as do most of the young people born with the internet) how many things she would have been exposed to even without it.

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    3. Certainly, but without the internet how would she be able to experience those things? Really, how often do you hear about, acquire, and consume media without going to the internet at some point? When was the last time you were "watching TV" and randomly flipped to a channel airing something you weren't familiar with but looked interesting? Do your friends often recommend something to you then lend you the dvd rather than tell you to watch it on netflix (assuming they didn't know about it thanks to the internet either)? These are certainly my favorite ways to find something I like, but they're far to infrequent to compare to the internet.

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    4. Not trying to start a fight here, but somehow people managed to find things and create fandoms before the Internet—many of which are still going today. The process was just a lot slower then.

      For instance, if a friend recommended a movie, it might entail going to the video store (or in the case of the really obscure, several video stores), looking through ads in a magazine, or placing an ad yourself. I first learned about Doctor Who from a book about sci-fi I saw at the library in 1988 but wouldn't see my first episode until 1993 because my work schedule conflicted with the local PBS air schedule and the Sci-Fi Channel (started in 1992) only ran episodes during the day when I was in class.

      I really don't mean to come across as a grumpy old man. The Internet has been a blessing for fandom (mostly) and I'm **still** discovering things from the past I never knew about.

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  3. Really digging those sleeves.

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  4. Dude, you owe your micro-fame to people like this "dope". Try labeling it again.

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  5. Yeah, that hits a little too close to be entirely comfortable. Like I remember first getting on the Internet to find out things about Final Fantasy 8, and what I found out was that it sucked. Without the Internet, I'd be going around having a whole bunch of uninformed opinions about what I like and don't.

    Which I guess brings us to Slartibartfast's dilemma: Would you rather be happy or be right?

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