October 28, 2011

After his girlfriend said that she really likes Adrian Tomine's illustration style...

No it isn't.

31 comments:

  1. I don't want to make you feel stupid, but don't correct people in public like that, especially your girlfriend. It makes you seem douchy.

    p.s. I'm also aware that I'm correcting you in public, but...well...hmmm.

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  2. It's cool we're allowed to look douchy on the internet.

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  3. I don't want you to feel stupid but I blew your best friend.

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  4. That guy was joking around. No one pronounces Adrian "Adran".

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  5. She already feels stupid ... she's out in public with you!

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  6. He's right about the last name, but not the first name.

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  7. I don't want to make you feel stupid, but you misspelled "actually".

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  8. "I don't want to make you feel stupid"
    Um, it's my guess that he actually does won't to make her feel stupid.

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  9. Mr Tim doesn't make mistakes; the misspelling of "actually" was apparent by the customer's tone of voice.

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  10. Proof that indie comics people can be just as douchey and petty as superhero fanboys. As if most of the publishing history of the Comics Journal wasn't enough...

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  11. Imagine that, somebody more loathsome than one of Tomine's characters. The mind boggles.

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  12. I don't want to make you feel stupid but "NO DRINKS IN THE STORE"!

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  13. Its spelled Adrian Tomine, but its pronounced Throatwarbler Mangrove.

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  14. I get the feeling that most of these people that appear on this blog probably aren't as dumb or douchey as they come off. Taking words at face value if you don't hear the tone or know the nuances of the relationship between the two people can be misleading. A lot of couples joke like that.

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  15. I want to believe you actually corrected his "correction" in-store.

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  16. I believe he was being sarcastic.

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  17. How IS his name pronouced anyways? Ay-Dree-An Tow-Mean? That's what I call him.

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  18. Douche Canoe Coming Through!

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  19. This reminds me of the time a decade ago I was in a band and the pretentious drummer kept insisting that Henry Rollins was pronounced "Rawlins" instead of Roll-ins, Bjork was pronounced Byerk, and Guy from Fugazi was pronounced "Gui". Whether he was technically right or wrong to this day I never bothered to figure out, but all I could think at the time is "quit being so anal and get a life!". Sheesh. Quitting that friggin' band was one of the best things I've ever done.

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  20. Anonymous who was once in a band:

    While I think the difference between "Rawlins" and "Rollins" is a subtle one that depends on your accent, your drummer was correct with regards to Bjork and Guy. I heard a radio interview where Bjork pronounced her name as "Byerk"; and I used to hang out on the DC scene, and everyone called Guy, "Gui."

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  21. 1:35 - yeah, wut a jerk for knowin' how too speek wurds rite. Wen wood yew evvir nede too now a faymuss musishun's naym inn thuh muzik indusstrie?

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  22. Ian: How Bjork and Guy personally pronounce their names is almost irrelevant when 99% of people and the media say it differently. There's a street in my town called buena vista, for instance. Now, I personally know how to pronounce the word correctly, but most locals call it "Biewna Vista" (rhymes with "view"-na). Say it properly, and people look at you as if you have nine heads. I don't care if Byork's name is really "Byerk", EVERYBODY calls her "Byork". So as far as I'm concerned, that's how it is. The drummer may have been right, but he was still being a prick.

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  23. 7:03 - Although I wish it weren't so, I completely agree. Language--pronunciation, spelling, definition--is determined by how it is used by the majority of people. It has always been evolving, and it's useless to try to stem the tide.

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  24. I don't agree that the majority gets to determine how a name is pronounced. If it's a person's name, then the person does. If it's a place, then the locals do.

    If, however, a majority pronounce it wrong, you are still being a prick if you correct them.

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  25. And "Lee Smith" is pronounced "Blarfengarde Blarfengarde."

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  26. @Anon 3:44
    That's total BS. I happen to know that, much like when Prince changed his name, this is a case where the artist decided to use an indecipherable random squiggle for his name. He just happened to pick one that looks like a name that's written in Latin characters.

    @Doctor Tarr:
    For locations I agree with you. Nobody in Detroit lives in "deh-twah". The Housten St. that gives SOHO and NOHO their names is "how-sten", not "hyu-sten" like that somewhat famous city in Texas. But when it comes to an individual's name, they are the only authority, and on the off-chance that I'd ever be likely to meet any such individual and completely hork it up, I'd very much prefer that anyone who _knows_ how to say it would tell me. It's people screwing up the pronunciation that drove Siddig El-Fadil to change his name to Alexander Siddig because he felt there was less chance that people would get it wrong, and he was getting seriously sick of hearing people screw it up when they'd meet him at conventions.

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  27. "When it comes to an individual's name, they are the only authority".

    Exactly. It's not my place to correct someone about a name unless it's mine. I do not have the authority to correct someone about your name. Only you do.

    I am not, however, going to participate in mispronunciation. If someone then corrects me, and they are wrong, then all bets are off.

    If it's a place name, like Newfoundland or Nevada or Pierre, South Dakota, which most people say wrong, I usually respond with "oh, you've been there?"

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  28. @Doctor Tarr
    I'd be less likely to correct a name that I've only "heard" is pronounced differently, but if I've witnessed the individual making the correction, either in person or some sort of interview, then I consider that to be a transfer of authority. Less authoritative would be when seeing an individual introduced on some sort of national TV show. Talk shows are rehearsed (at least the late-night ones are), so if the host borks a name during rehearsal, that's the time for the individual in question to point it out, and then the taped version should neatly avoid that. Same thing for awards shows, though I'm less likely to pick up a pronunciation from one of those on the fact that I generally avoid watching them.

    Point is, if you are an individual who constantly has to correct other people on how to pronounce your name, not having to do so once in a blue moon probably feels like enough of a relief to justify other people passing it on for you.

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  29. it IS tominay, it's Japanese!

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