September 6, 2011

To his friend (in an British accent) regarding the SCOTT PILGRIM DVD...

28 comments:

  1. Oh, and it was directed by a Brit.... And Michael Cera is from Canada....

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  2. As in, former property and current commonwealth of...Britain!

    And what Brits is he talking about? Assuming we're only talking superheroes who are from America, the only ones I can think of are Christian Bale (if you count Wales) and Henry Cavill. Even dropping that assumption, there's an Aussie playing Thor and that's it.

    Also, hilariously, that movie has a bunch of stars that have played or are playing superheroes in film: Chris Evans (Human Torch, Captain America), Brandon Routh (Superman), and Thomas Jane (Punisher).

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  3. yeah no one takes Robert Downy Jr seriously...

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  4. So...one's ability to impersonate superheroes is the litmus for whether or not one is being taken seriously?

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  5. Spider-Man is also a Brit. This guy may be on to something. Or on something. Whatever.

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  6. Exactly what is a "British" accent? English, Welsh or Scottish (not conaidering the many, wildly differing regional variations)?

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  7. Wait... I'm confused... was Scott Pilgrim meant to be a superhero movie?

    And if we're talking about men who shouldn't be taken seriously, lets talk about Benny Hill...

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  8. Don't forget Ryan Reynolds, but that doesn't mean anything.

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  9. @S.V.K. A British accent is one that is English, Welsh or Scottish ... as opposed to one that is American in this case. The context made that crustal clear, except apparently to pedantic twats.

    You know ... people talk about "American accents" all the time, and folks know what they means, despite the fact that the US has a larger variety of regional accents than the British Isles.

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  10. Damn Brits stealing our heroes! The next James Bond should be Carrot Top in retaliation!

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  11. @John Dukehart: "lets talk about Benny Hill... "

    Best not to really, the rather large gap between when people in Britain stopped watching (or paying attention to) that and when people in America did says far more about the U.S's audiance taste than the U.K's.

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  12. @anon "...the fact that the US has a larger variety of regional accents than the British Isles."

    You'd be surpirsed just how wrong that is, you really would.

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  13. This reminds me of that time some disgruntled fans said that Harry and HErmione not being a couple was "A failure of the American education system."

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  14. I think the British Isles have an order of magnitude more regional accents.

    I can only differentiate a dozen or so, but I'm an American who hasn't spent much time there, and I've only been to places on the big island.

    While Scott Pilgrim was an American movie, Wright sure put his mark on it.

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  15. Anti-Social FatMan9/06/2011 8:09 PM

    It's getting kind of weird just how many British people are in these Superhero films now.

    Batman is Welsh, and his villain in TDKR is English. Spider-Man is English, and his villain (or one of them) in Amazing is Welsh. Superman is English.

    Credit to Americans, though, they don't bitch about it. Most probably don't even realise. If an American actor was James Bond there'd be riots in the streets. More riots, I mean.

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  16. Anti-social Fatman: We figure it's only fair, as we've got an American playing the most iconic British character of all - Sherlock Holmes.

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  17. Trae - you've also got Benedict Cumberbatch, who is frankly amazing. I'm glad that decades of dealing with alternate continuities in comic books conditioned me to deal with two simultaneous Sherlock Holmes series.

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  18. I'm guessing a "British" accent is English more than anything... of course there's always the possibility he lumped Yorkshire, Scottish, Welsh, Cornish, Southern ... I could go on, but any Americans wondering check out this map:

    http://sounds.bl.uk/maps/Accents-and-dialects.html

    And that doesn't include Northern Ireland, Scotland or Wales ...

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  19. Niether Spiderman is English. And I gotta say, who cares. The English do produce some great actors. I, for one, am happy with most of the English choices.

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  20. When I lived in London, I noticed a lot of Folks were incapable of distinguishing between a typical Canadian and U.S. accent. Some of the more extreme U.S. regional accents could be distinguished (like the difference between "Valley Girl" and Brooklyn), but a lot of the time Canadian shows were mistakenly identified as "American".

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  21. The lead actor in Kick-Ass was also British, but that was a British comic to begin with.

    As a Brit, I'd say it's just that many of our actors have learned the best career move is to develop a convincing American accent. And they're probably willing to work for less than Americans.

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  22. Isn't the comic itself from Canada, by a Canadian?

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  23. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  24. I sincerely hope he was an American teenager and the accent was an affectation.

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  25. "The lead actor in Kick-Ass was also British, but that was a British comic to begin with."

    Nick Cage isn't British.

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  26. Nicholas Cage isn't the lead actor in Kick-Ass, boss.

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